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Principles of Chemical Science

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  • Course Description

    This course provides an introduction to the chemistry of biological, inorganic, and organic molecules. The emphasis is on basic principles of atomic and molecular electronic structure, thermodynamics, acid-base and redox equilibria, chemical kinetics, and catalysis. In an effort to illuminate connections between chemistry and biology, a list of the biology-, medicine-, and MIT research-related examples used in 5.111 is provided in Biology-Related Examples. Acknowledgements Development and implementation of the biology-related materials in this course were funded through an HHMI Professors grant to Prof. Catherine L. Drennan.

    About Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel Taylor

    Professor Catherine Drennan is a Professor of Chemistry and Biology at MIT. She is currently an Investigator and a Professor of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI). In 2006, Professor Drennan was awarded an HHMI Professorship to fund a proposal entitled “Getting Biologists Excited about Chemistry,” which focuses on increasing the interdisciplinary crosstalk between biology and chemistry. One of the aims of the HHMI initiative is to enhance the freshmen Chemistry course at MIT (5.111) by incorporating biological examples into the course. Dr. Elizabeth Vogel Taylor is an HHMI Instructor in the Chemistry Department at MIT. She works with HHMI Professor Cathy Drennan on her HHMI initiatives: “Improving Chemistry Teaching and Mentoring Nationwide”. Beth’s educational interests focus on generating free and easy-to-implement materials for science educators, including creating and assessing examples for general chemistry lectures that demonstrate the chemical principles behind inspiring examples in biology, medicine, and MIT research. Taylor has also been involved in graduate student TA and mentor training and in creating a training manual to address stereotype threat in the classroom. Beth teaches freshman chemistry (MIT Course 5.111) and has developed and taught biochemistry laboratory modules (MIT Course 5.36).

    Note: Contents for this page are Licensed from http://ocw.mit.edu under the Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike license.

    School
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Course Code
    5.111

    Date Taught
    Fall 2008

    Level
    Undergraduate (First Year)
  • Course Meeting Times

    Lectures: 3 sessions / week, 1 hour / session

    Recitations: 2 sessions / week, 1 hour / session

    Textbooks

    Amazon logo Atkins, Peter, and Loretta Jones. Chemical Principles: The Quest for Insight. 4th ed. New York, NY: W.H. Freeman and Company, 2007. ISBN: 9781429209656.

    Amazon logo Krenos, John. Chemical Principles: The Quest for Insight/Student Study Guide and Solutions Manual. 4th ed. New York, NY: W.H. Freeman and Company, 2007. ISBN: 9781429200998. (Amazon logo Bundled set. ISBN: 9781429212595.)

    Lecture Notes

    Lecture notes (with blanks) are provided for each lecture. Students are expected to follow along during the lecture in order to fill in the blanks in the notes.

    Grading

    Grades will be based on a total of 750 points.

    ACTIVITIES POINTS
    Three one-hour exams (3 x 100 points) 300
    Three-hour final exam 300
    Problem sets 100
    Attendance and in-class "quizzes" 50

    Homework

    There will be 10 problem sets assigned during the semester. Assignments will be graded, and will be worth a total of 100 points of your final grade. The problem sets are not included in these course materials.

    Exams

    There will be three hour-long exams during the semester and a three-hour-long final exam. All exams are closed-book and closed-notes. Most required equations and a periodic table will be provided.

    Biology Topics

    In an effort to illuminate connections between chemistry and biology and spark students' excitement for chemistry, we incorporate frequent biology-related examples into the lectures. These in-class examples range from two to ten minutes, designed to succinctly introduce biological connections without sacrificing any chemistry content in the curriculum.

    A list of the biology-, medicine-, and MIT research-related examples used in 5.111 is provided in  Biology-Related Examples.

    Significant Figures

    Rules for scientific notation and significant figures are available in the back of the textbook in Appendix 1, pages A5-A6. You are also responsible for knowing the following SI prefixes: n (nano, 10-9), µ (micro, 10-6), m (milli, 10-3), c (centi, 10-2), and k (kilo, 103)

    Clicker Questions

    We will use classroom response devices during lectures to take attendance, enable feedback, and facilitate occasional in-class quizzes. We have outlined the following points to help clarify the class policies regarding clicker use.

    Why are we using clickers?

    1. Clickers give us additional feedback on whether the class as a whole understands a given concept or when our explanations need to be expanded or clarified. This enables us to gauge the understanding of the entire class and adjust our lessons accordingly.
    2. Clickers also provide you as a student feedback on how well you understand the material and how fast you are able to solve problems. For example, if you are able to solve the homework problems but run out of time on in-class slicker questions, it is a good indication that you will be pinched for time on the exam and may need to work through more practice problems to increase your speed.
    3. We feel it is appropriate to reward the many students that consistently come to class and participate. In addition, because we take attendance we feel more comfortable posting lecture notes online.

    Answering in-class clicker questions

    1. Apart from announced in-class quiz questions, you will not be graded on whether you answer clicker questions correctly.
    2. For routine clicker questions, you are encouraged to attempt the question on your own, but you are certainly allowed to quietly discuss the problem with your neighbor. For announced quiz questions, any talking or sharing answers in considered cheating.

    Calendar

    The calendar below provides information on the course's lecture (L) and exam (E) sessions.

    SES # TOPICS KEY DATES
    L1 The importance of chemical principles  
    L2 Discovery of electron and nucleus, need for quantum mechanics  
    L3 Wave-particle duality of light  
    L4 Wave-particle duality of matter, Schrödinger equation  
    L5 Hydrogen atom energy levels Problem set 1 due
    L6 Hydrogen atom wavefunctions (orbitals)  
    L7 p-orbitals  
    L8 Multielectron atoms and electron configurations Problem set 2 due
    L9 Periodic trends  
    L10 Periodic trends continued; Covalent bonds Problem set 3 due
    L11 Lewis structures  
    E1 Exam 1 covering lectures 1-9  
    L12 Exceptions to Lewis structure rules; Ionic bonds  
    L13 Polar covalent bonds; VSEPR theory  
    L14 Molecular orbital theory  
    L15 Valence bond theory and hybridization Problem set 4 due
    L16 Determining hybridization in complex molecules; Thermochemistry and bond energies/bond enthalpies  
    L17 Entropy and disorder Problem set 5 due
    L18 Free energy and control of spontaneity  
    E2 Exam 2 covering lectures 10-16  
    L19 Chemical equilibrium  
    L20 Le Chatelier's principle and applications to blood-oxygen levels  
    L21 Acid-base equilibrium: Is MIT water safe to drink?  
    L22 Chemical and biological buffers Problem set 6 due
    L23 Acid-base titrations  
    L24 Balancing oxidation/reduction equations  
    L25 Electrochemical cells Problem set 7 due
    L26 Chemical and biological oxidation/reduction reactions  
    L27 Transition metals and the treatment of lead poisoning Problem set 8 due
    L28 Crystal field theory  
    E3 Exam 3 covering lectures 17-26  
    L29 Metals in biology  
    L30 Magnetism and spectrochemical theory  
    L31 Rate laws Problem set 9 due
    L32 Nuclear chemistry and elementary reactions  
    L33 Reaction mechanism  
    L34 Temperature and kinetics Problem set 10 due
    L35 Enzyme catalysis  
    L36 Biochemistry  
    E4 Final exam covering lecture 1-36
  • Lectures
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 1 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 2 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 3 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 4 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 5 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 6 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 7 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 8 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 9 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 10 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 11 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 12 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 13 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 14 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 15 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 16 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 17 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 18 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 19 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 20 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 21 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 22 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 23 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 24 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 25 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 26 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 27 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 28 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 29 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 30 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 31 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 32 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 33 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 34 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 35 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
    Principles of Chemical Science - Lecture 36 - Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel TaylorView
  • DescriptionTypeLink
    Exam 1DownloadClick
    Exam 2DownloadClick
    Exam 3DownloadClick
    Exam 1 InformationDownloadClick
    Exam 1 Equation SheetDownloadClick
    Exam 2 InformationDownloadClick
    Exam 2 equation SheetDownloadClick
    Exam 3 InformationDownloadClick
    Exam 3 Equation SheetDownloadClick
    Final Exam InformationDownloadClick
  • DescriptionTypeLink
    The importance of Chemical Princples Notes DownloadClick
    Discovery of electron and nucleus, need for quantum mechanics NotesDownloadClick
    Wave-particle duality of light NotesDownloadClick
    Wave-particle duality of matter, Schrödinger equationDownloadClick
    Hydrogen atom energy levelsDownloadClick
    Hydrogen atom wavefunctions (orbitals)DownloadClick
    p-orbitalsDownloadClick
    Multelectron atoms and electron configurationsDownloadClick
    Periodic trendsDownloadClick
    Periodic trends continued; Covalent bondsDownloadClick
    Lewis structures NotesDownloadClick
    Exceptions to Lewis structure rules; Ionic bondsDownloadClick
    Polar covalent bonds; VSEPR theoryDownloadClick
    Molecular orbital theoryDownloadClick
    Valence bond theory and hybridizationDownloadClick
    Determining hybridization in complex molecules; Termochemistry and bond energies/bond enthalpiesDownloadClick
    Entropy and disorderDownloadClick
    Free energy and control of spontaneityDownloadClick
    Chemical equilibriumDownloadClick
    Le Chatelier's principle and applications to blood-oxygen levelsDownloadClick
    Acid-base equilibrium: Is MIT water safe to drink?DownloadClick
    Chemical and biological buffersDownloadClick
    Acid-base titrationsDownloadClick
    Balancing oxidation/reduction equationsDownloadClick
    Electrochemical cellsDownloadClick
    Chemical and biological oxidation/reduction reactionsDownloadClick
    Transition metals and the treatment of lead poisoningDownloadClick
    Crystal field theoryDownloadClick
    Metals in biologyDownloadClick
    Magnetism and spectrochemical theoryDownloadClick
    Rate lawsDownloadClick
    Nuclear chemistry and elementary reactionsDownloadClick
    Reaction mechanismDownloadClick
    Temperature and kineticsDownloadClick
    Enzyme catalysisDownloadClick
    BiochemistryDownloadClick
  • DescriptionTypeLink
    Course Materiasl DownloadaDownloadClick
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