Chemistry 2011.org
Chemistry2011.org
All About Chemistry... 2011 and beyond

Chemistry Resources

Within this section you will find instructional materials, course notes, lectures, and other resources of interest to chemistry teachers, students, and self-learners.

We have sorted the material based on education level and welcome any submissions of new resources to this listing as well as recommendations on how to make it better.

Youth
High School
College / University
  • Chemistry Behind the Magic: Chemical Demonstrations for the Classroom

    Chemistry Behind the Magic: Chemical Demonstrations for the Classroom

    Dr. John Dolhun, Dr. Bassan Shakhashiri, Jessica Harrop
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Chemistry Behind the Magic features videos of exciting live chemistry demonstrations. The videos are enhanced by explanations of the science behind the demonstration, in a fun and easy to understand format.

  • Advance Analytical Course

    Advance Analytical Course

    Dr. Padma S Vankar
    Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur

    The course covers lessons on chromatographic techniques—such as gaschromatography (GC) with all the types of detectors—electron capture (ECD), flame ionization (FID), thermal couple (TCD), Nitrogen-Phosphorus (NPD) and mass spectrometry (MS), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and reverse –phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), liquid chromatography with mass detection (LC-MS), thin layer chromatography (TLC), high pressure thin layer chromatography (HPTLC), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS, inductively coupled plasma emission (ICP/AES), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and ultraviolet/visible spectrometry (UV/Vis).


    Advanced Mathematical Techniques in Chemical Engineering

    Advanced Mathematical Techniques in Chemical Engineering

    Prof S. De
    Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur

    The course covers lesoons on Advanced Mathematical Techniques such as Introduction of Vector Space, Matrix, Determinants and properties. There are 41 Lectures.


    Atomistic Computer Modeling of Materials

    Atomistic Computer Modeling of Materials

    Prof. Gerbrand Ceder, Prof. Nicola Marzari
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    This course uses the theory and application of atomistic computer simulations to model, understand, and predict the properties of real materials. Specific topics include: energy models from classical potentials to first-principles approaches; density functional theory and the total-energy pseudopotential method; errors and accuracy of quantitative predictions: thermodynamic ensembles, Monte Carlo sampling and molecular dynamics simulations; free energy and phase transitions; fluctuations and transport properties; and coarse-graining approaches and mesoscale models. The course employs case studies from industrial applications of advanced materials to nanotechnology. Several laboratories will give students direct experience with simulations of classical force fields, electronic-structure approaches, molecular dynamics, and Monte Carlo.


    Biochemical Engineering

    Biochemical Engineering

    Dr. Saikat Chakraborty , Dr. Rintu Banerjee
    Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur

    Basics of Biology, Overview of Biotechnology, Diversity in Microbial Cells, Cell Constituents, Chemicals for Life. Kinetics of Enzyme Catalysis. Immobilized Enzymes: effects of intra and inter-phase mass transfer on enzyme kinetics. Major Metabolic Pathways: Bioenergetics, Glucose Metabolism, Biosynthesis. Microbial Growth: Continuum and Stochastic Models. Design, Analysis and Stability of Bioreactors. Kinetics of Receptor-Ligand Binding. Receptor-mediated Endocytosis. Multiple Interacting Microbial Population: Prey-Predator Models. Bio-product Recovery & Bio-separations, Manufacture of Biochemical Products.


    Biochemistry I

    Biochemistry I

    Prof. S. Dasgupta
    Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur

    Principles of Bioenergetics with special reference to carbohydrate metabolism Structures and Functions of Biological Molecules Amino acids and Proteins Enzymes Vitamins and Coenzymes Carbohydrates and Lipids


    Biochemistry Laboratory

    Biochemistry Laboratory

    Dr. Elizabeth Vogel Taylor
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    The course, which spans two thirds of a semester, provides students with a research-inspired laboratory experience that introduces standard biochemical techniques in the context of investigating a current and exciting research topic, acquired resistance to the cancer drug Gleevec. Techniques include protein expression, purification, and gel analysis, PCR, site-directed mutagenesis, kinase activity assays, and protein structure viewing. This class is part of the new laboratory curriculum in the MIT Department of Chemistry. Undergraduate Research-Inspired Experimental Chemistry Alternatives (URIECA) introduces students to cutting edge research topics in a modular format.


    Biological Chemistry II

    Biological Chemistry II

    Prof. Joanne Stubbe Prof. Alice Ting
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    This course deals with a more advanced treatment of the biochemical mechanisms that underlie biological processes. Emphasis will be given to the experimental methods used to unravel how these processes fit into the cellular context as well as the coordinated regulation of these processes. Topics include macromolecular machines for energy and force transduction, regulation of biosynthetic and degradative pathways, and the structure and function of nucleic acids.


    CHEM 125A: Freshman Organic Chemistry I

    CHEM 125A: Freshman Organic Chemistry I

    Professor J. Michael McBride
    Yale

    This is the first semester in a two-semester introductory course focused on current theories of structure and mechanism in organic chemistry, their historical development, and their basis in experimental observation. The course is open to freshmen with excellent preparation in chemistry and physics, and it aims to develop both taste for original science and intellectual skills necessary for creative research.


    CHEM 125A: Freshman Organic Chemistry II

    CHEM 125A: Freshman Organic Chemistry II

    Professor J. Michael McBride
    Yale

    This is a continuation of Freshman Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 125a), the introductory course on current theories of structure and mechanism in organic chemistry for students with excellent preparation in chemistry and physics. This semester treats simple and complex reaction mechanisms, spectroscopy, organic synthesis, and some molecules of nature.


    Chem 3b Chemical Structure and Reactivity

    Chem 3b Chemical Structure and Reactivity

    Dr. Peter Vollhardt
    Berkeley

    Conjugation, aromatic chemistry, carbonyl compounds, carbohydrates, amines, carboxylic acids, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and nucleic acid chemistry. Ultraviolet spectroscopy and mass spectrometry will be introduced.


    Chem 5: Scientific Computing Skills

    Chem 5: Scientific Computing Skills

    Douglas Tobias Ph. D.
    University of California, Irvine

    This course has 26-lecture undergraduate-level course titled "Scientific Computing Skills" taught at UC Irvine by Professor Douglas Tobias. Prerequisites: Chemistry 1A - 1B


    Chemical Reaction Engineering

    Chemical Reaction Engineering

    Prof. Jayant M Modak
    Indian Institute of Science

    The objective of this course is to help the student master several advanced ideas in chemical reaction engineering, notably: Complex chemical reaction mechanisms and kinetics. Transport effects in multiphase reactive systems. Advanced reactor design and stability, including consideration of the energy balance. On completion of the course, the student should be able to design/analyze a variety of complex reacting systems in both traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering.


    Chemistry 131B - Molecular Structure and Elementary Statistical Mechanics

    Chemistry 131B - Molecular Structure and Elementary Statistical Mechanics

    Rachel W. Martin Ph.D
    University of California, Irvine

    Principles of quantum mechanics with application to the elements of atomic structure and energy levels, diatomic molecular spectroscopy and structure determination, and chemical bonding in simple molecules.Prerequisites: Chemistry 131A


    Chemistry 131C Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics

    Chemistry 131C  Thermodynamics and Chemical Dynamics

    Reginald M. Penner Ph.D
    University of California, Irvine

    This course covers topics such as Energy, entropy, and the thermodynamic potentials. Chemical equilibrium. Chemical kinetics.


    Chemistry 1A General Chemistry

    Chemistry 1A General Chemistry

    Angelica Stacy
    Berkeley

    Webcast Lecture series including stoichiometry of chemical reactions, chemical bonding, the elements, periodic table, real and ideal gases, thermochemistry, introduction to thermodynamics and equilibrium, quantum mechanical description of atoms, acid-base and solubility equilibria, introduction to oxidation-reduction reactions, introduction to chemical kinetics.


    Chemistry 1B General Chemistry

    Chemistry 1B General Chemistry

    Donald R. Blake Ph.D.
    University of California, Irvine

    General Chemistry (Chem 1B) is part of OpenChem: http://learn.uci.edu/openchem Prerequisites: Chemistry 1A. This course has 17 lecture undergraduate-level.


    Chemistry 203, Organic Spectroscopy

    Chemistry 203, Organic Spectroscopy

    Prof. James S. Nowick
    University of California, Irvine

    The course covers infrared (IR) spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the latter of which is the main focus. Topics covered in the NMR spectroscopy part of the course include chemical shifts, spin-spin coupling, dynamic effects in NMR spectroscopy, and 2D NMR spectroscopy (COSY, HMQC, HMBC, TOCSY, NOESY, ROESY).


    Chemistry 51A Organic Chemistry

    Chemistry 51A Organic Chemistry

    Prof. James S. Nowick
    University of California, Irvine

    This course covers topics such as bonding and structures, acids and bases, organic molecules and functional groups, alkanes, stereochemistry, organic reactions, alkyl halides and nucleophilic substitution, alkyl halides and elimination reactions, and other various topics The course is titled Chem 51A and is the first of a three-quarter sequence comprising Chem 51A, Chem 51B, and Chem 51C.


    Chemistry 51B Organic Chemistry

    Chemistry 51B Organic Chemistry

    David Van Vranken, Ph.D.
    University of California, Irvine

    This course covers topics such as: Properties of gases, liquids, and solids,Changes of states ,solutions ,Thermodynamics. Prerequisites: Chemistry 51A


    Chemistry 51C Organic Chemistry

    Chemistry 51C Organic Chemistry

    James Nowick, Ph.D.
    University of California, Irvine

    This course introduces major topics of general and organic chemistry, and biochemistry. The following topics are included: measurements, atomic structure, bonding, nomenclature, solutions, kinetics, thermochemistry, nuclear chemistry, equilibrium, acids and bases, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, and organic chemistry, Prerequisites: Chemistry 51B.


    Chemistry Laboratory Techniques

    Chemistry Laboratory Techniques

    John J. Dolhun, Dr. Kimberly Berkowski Dr. Sarah Tabacco Aayesha Siddiqui Eileen Huang
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    This course is an intensive introduction to the techniques of experimental chemistry and gives first year students an opportunity to learn and master the basic chemistry lab techniques for carrying out experiments. Students who successfully complete the course and obtain a "Competent Chemist" (CC) or "Expert Experimentalist" (EE) rating are likely to secure opportunities for research work in a chemistry lab at MIT. Acknowledgements The laboratory manual and materials for this course were prepared by Dr. Katherine J. Franz and Dr. Kevin M. Shea with the assistance of Professors Rick L. Danheiser and Timothy M. Swager. Materials have been revised by Dr. J. Haseltine, Dr. Kevin M. Shea, Dr. Sarah A. Tabacco, Dr. Kimberly L. Berkowski, Anne M. (Gorham) Rachupka, and Dr. John J. Dolhun. Course Highlights 5.301 includes a series of chemistry laboratory instructional videos called the Digital Lab Techniques Manual (DLTM), used as supplementary material for this course as well as other courses offered by the Chemistry department. The full "Digital Lab Techniques Manual" is available in our Supplemental Resources section under Chemistry. This course is offered during MIT's Independent Activities Period (IAP)—a special 4-week term that runs the full month of January. You can follow the students who took 5.301 in January 2012, as they faced the challenges of learning chemistry the MIT way, through a unique video series called ChemLab Boot Camp.


    Chemistry of Materials

    Chemistry of Materials

    Prof. S. Sundar Manoharan
    Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur


    Essentials in Immunology

    Essentials in Immunology

    Dr. R Manjunath, Dr. Dipankar Nandi, Prof. Anjali Karande
    Indian Institute of Science

    The course is meant for post-graduate students. The course covers all aspects of the immune system from basic aspects like organs and cells of the system to cellular networks that are necessary for optimum immunological responses.


    Eukaryotic Gene Expression - basics and benefits

    Eukaryotic Gene Expression - basics and benefits

    Prof. P.N. Rangarajan
    Indian Institute of Science

    The objective of this course is to expose the viewer to basic aspects of regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes and explain the benefits that have accrued out of basic research in this area. The course is organized such that the viewer will learn not only gain knowledge on the molecular mechanisms involved in eukaryotic gene regulation but also will appreciate the benefits that have accrued through the exploitation of knowledge gained from the basic research, primarily in the areas of disease diagnosis and their prevention, agriculture etc. Through this course the instructor wishes to convey the message that knowledge of eukaryotic gene regulation is essential for understanding and appreciating a number of biotechnological applications in the areas of medicine and agriculture.


    Fundamentals of Transport Processes

    Fundamentals of Transport Processes

    Prof. V. Kumaran
    Indian Institute of Science

    The objective of this course it to provide a fundamental understanding of the convection and diffusion process in fluids, and how these determine the rates of transport of mass, heat and momentum.


    Fundamentals of Transport Processes - II

    Fundamentals of Transport Processes - II

    Prof. V. Kumaran
    Indian Institute of Science

    The objective of this course is to provide a fundamental understanding of momentum transport and fluid mechanics.


    General Chemistry 1A

    General Chemistry 1A

    Amanda Brindley, Ph. D
    University of California, Irvine

    Prerequisites: One year of high school chemistry is strongly recommended. Please visit the site below to get all the details about signing up for sapling. Don't forget to insert your student ID number as shown by the pictures on the linked page. If you do not do this I will be unable to retrieve your grades from the webpage and will have no choice but to give you a zero. This is obviously not something you want to happen as it will be detrimental to your grade. There are step by step directions with pictures and arrows describing how to do this. I will not accept "I didn't know how" as an excuse. If you do not follow these step by step instructions you will get a ZERO on your homework score. http://sites.uci.edu/brindleychemmaterials/sapling-instructions/


    General Chemistry 1C

    General Chemistry 1C

    Ramesh D. Arasasingham, Ph.D
    University of California, Irvine

    The prerequisite for this course is Chemistry 1B This course covers lecture topics such as, equilibria, reactions, and electrochemistry.


    Heat Transfer

    Heat Transfer

    Prof. A.K. Ghoshal
    Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati

    The course will introduce the fundamental concepts of various modes of heat transfer. It will further elaborate these concepts with theories and applications to the solutions of practically relevant problems. Some aspects of process design principles of various heat transfer equipment will be taken up in the later part of this course. Finally, to present a physical picture of the convection process, heat transfer in boundary layer flows will be addressed. Even though the course is primarily designed to meet the requirements of an undergraduate course on heat transfer, it will be useful for the practicing engineers to refresh with fundamental and technical information. Contents: Introduction to conductive, convective and radiation heat transfer; steady and unsteady state conduction in one dimension; forced and free convection heat transfer. Heat transfer analysis for boundary layer flows; condensation; boiling; evaporation; black and gray body radiation heat transfer with radiation network; radiation shield.


    Instability and Patterning of Thin Polymer Films

    Instability and Patterning of Thin Polymer Films

    Dr. R. Mukherjee
    Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur

    This course will expose students to the science of sub-micron, meso and nanoscale patterning of surfaces with special emphasis on thin soft films like gels, polymers etc. The course will focus on the different classes of thin film patterning techniques like the top down techniques (lithography), bottom up techniques (self assembly and self organization) as well as combination of the two (confined and template guided self organization) as well as focus on various engineering applications of the patterned thin films like super wetting and super hydrophobicity, structural color, metamaterials, super adhesives and easy release coatings, microfluidics etc. The course will be expose the students to the various soft lithography techniques and will focus on how hydrodynamics and capillarity plays and intriguingly critical role in evolution and pattern formation. State of art concepts like "patterns on demand", "reconfigurable structures", "patterning beyond the master', "patterning of non planar surfaces", "pattern miniaturization by shrinkage" etc. will also be covered in the course. Contents: General Introduction to Patterning; Lithography Techniques, Applications of Patterned thin films. Classification of Patterning Techniques: Top Down, Bottom up, combined techniques; Serial vs. Parallel Techniques. Soft Lithography: basics, key concepts, major techniques - Micro Contact Printing, Nano imprint Lithography, Hot Embossing, Replica Molding (REM), Micro Molding in Capillaries (MIMIC), Capillary Force Lithography (CFL), Polymer Bonding Lithography; Patterning of films coated on Curved Surfaces. Soft Lithography for patterning of inorganic (sol-gel) thin films and Hydrogels. Hydrodynamics of a free surface, Capillarity, Physical origin of Instability, Wetting and dewetting, Length Scales Analysis, Pattern Formation. Ordered pattern formation by template guided and confined dewetting, Dewetting of Bilayers Elastic Contact Instability: concepts, governing equations, Elastic contact Lithography, Pattern Miniaturization in Bilayers, Adhesive Force Assisted Imprinting. Electric Filed and Thermal gradient induced patterning, Electrohydrodynamics, LISA (Lithographically Induced Self Assembly). Stress Engineering. Multi scale patterning. Applications of Patterned Thin Films: Super Hydrophobic and Super Wetting Surfaces, Structural Color, Super Adhesives and Easy Release Coatings, Micro Fluidics etc.


    Introduction to Chemical Engineering

    Introduction to Chemical Engineering

    Professor Channing Robertson
    Stanford University

    Introduction to Chemical Engineering (E20) is an introductory course offered by the Stanford University Engineering Department. It provides a basic overview of the chemical engineering field today and delves into the applications of chemical engineering.


    Introduction to solid state Chemistry

    Introduction to solid state Chemistry

    Prof. Donald R. Sadoway
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Introduction to Solid State Chemistry is a one-semester college course on the principles of chemistry. This unique and popular course satisfies MIT's general chemistry degree requirement, with an emphasis on solid-state materials and their application to engineering systems. You'll begin with an exploration of the fundamental relationship between electronic structure, chemical bonding, and atomic order, then proceed to the chemical properties of "aggregates of molecules," including crystals, metals, glasses, semiconductors, solutions and acid-base equilibria, polymers, and biomaterials. Real-world examples are drawn from industrial practice (e.g. semiconductor manufacturing), energy generation and storage (e.g. automobile engines, lithium batteries), emerging technologies (e.g. photonic and biomedical devices), and the environmental impact of chemical processing (e.g. recycling glass, metal, and plastic). Is This Course for Me? 3.091SC is not "just a chemistry class" - it's a chemistry-centered class that integrates examples from the world around us, in the arts and humanities, the human stories behind the science, and applications to engineering and emerging technologies. If you've taken chemistry classes before (for instance, high school AP Chemistry or another college-level chemistry overview), 3.091SC offers a fresh look at some familiar topics, and includes other topics that fall outside the "standard" chemistry curriculum. While it satisfies MIT's graduation requirement for general chemistry — and thus may be the last chemistry class you take — 3.091SC is also a solid basis for many more years of study in chemistry-intensive subjects.


    Introductory Quantum Mechanics II

    Introductory Quantum Mechanics II

    Prof. Andrei Tokmakoff
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    This course covers topics in time-dependent quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, and relaxation, with an emphasis on descriptions applicable to condensed phase problems and a statistical description of ensembles.


    Mass Transfer II

    Mass  Transfer II

    Prof. Nishith Verma
    Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur

    This second course on mass transfer introduces the fundamental concepts, principles and applications of mass transfer processes. The course covers mass transfer fundamentals such as diffusion, film theory and mass transfer coefficients. The modeling, design and performance calculation aspects of separation processes using rate-based and equilibrium stage based modeling approaches are then developed. Separation processes covered in detail include absorption, distillation, extraction, adsorption and drying. Newer processes such as membrane separations, ion exchange etc are also covered. For completeness, salient equipment design features are presented. A number of chosen problems are solved to illustrate the concepts clearly.


    Microscale Transport Processes

    Microscale Transport Processes

    Dr. Somnath Ganguly Prof. S. Dasgupta
    Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur

    The course on micro-scale transport process introduces the fundamental concepts, principles and application of momentum. Energy and diffusion processes in micro-scale to undergraduate and graduate students of relevant engineering disciplines, e.g., mechanical, chemical, instrumentation, electronics and biomedical engineering. The course opens with an elaborate discussion on micro-fabrication techniques, and gives the students a good exposure to the practical aspects of micro-scale transport devices. Next, the classical laws of fluid flow, and how they get affected by the free molecular flow are reviewed. The electro-kinetic flow is introduced with discussion on electric double layer and Debye length. Use of interfacial forces in capillaryfilling with passive control of flow is presented. The array of electrodes that are instrumental in moving / merging / splitting droplets by electro-wetting is described. The main issues of successful microstructures are presented. The concepts and examples of micro heat pipes for microscale cooling are introduced. Consequences of size reduction for different processes and the relevance of material properties and processes, in miniaturized devices are explored. Beginning with simple atomic encounters from statistical mechanics, macroscopic balance equations and transport properties are derived and the relevance of continuum assumption and the Limits of linear transport properties are analyzed. The momentum and heat transfer equations in microscale are developed incorporating viscous heating and entropy generation in channel flow. Finally microfluidic network for heat and mass transfer and relevant relations are introduced. Micro-reactor comprising of multi-channel stack is described and the associated heat- transfer is addressed using theoretical models. Taylor dispersion as it applies to micro-channel of non-circular cross-section is derived. Micro-mixing based on chaotic advection in slanted groove and staggered herringbone is discussed using Poincare map. Lagrangian particle tracking techniques in CFD for calculation of mixing effectiveness are explained. Fractionation of aggregates in a stream, based on size, charge, polarity etc. is discussed. Architecture, based on optimal routing of fluid is elaborated.


    Modern Instrumental Methods of Analysis

    Modern Instrumental Methods of Analysis

    Dr. J.R. Mudakavi
    Indian Institute of Science

    This course is designed to familiarize the students with various instrumental methods of chemical analysis that scientists and engineers come across during their course work and research undertakings. The participants are introduced to the principles of chemical analysis, matrix effects, detailed instrumentation, operation and interpretation of data, error analysis and statistical methods of data handling. At the end of the course the student would be able to handle the analysis of mg, ppm and ppb levels of analyte by appropriate instrumental methods. Applications: Chemical analysis of hazardous materials, environmental samples, inorganic, organic and biomaterials at trace and ultra trace quantities.


    Multiphase Flow

    Multiphase Flow

    Prof. P.K. Das Prof. Gargi Das
    Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur

    This course introduces the fundamental concepts, principles and application of multiphase flow. The course opens with real life examples of such flow and its importance in process industries. In connection with gas-liquid two phase flow, different flow regimes and flow regime maps are discussed. Next, various analytical models are introduced to understand the hydrodynamics of different flow regimes. The phenomenon of choking is explained and relevant formulations are derived. The concept of bubble formation and bubble dynamics are presented. The important aspects of hydrodynamics of solid-liquid and gas-solid flows are also discussed. Hydrodynamics of three phase flows are analyzed and compared with two phase flow situations. Lastly various measurement techniques used for measuring pressure drop, void fraction and identification of flow patterns are introduced. Contents: Definition of multiphase flow, flow patterns, one dimensional steady homogenous equilibrium flow, one dimensional steady separated flow model, choking and critical flow rate. General theory of drift flux model, Bubble formation and bubble dynamics, hydrodynamics of solid-liquid and gas-solid flow, hydrodynamics of three phase gas-liquid-liquid flows, Measurement techniques in multiphase flow.


    Novel Separation Processes

    Novel Separation Processes

    Prof. S. De
    Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur

    COURSE OUTLINE Fundamentals of Separation Processes; Basic definitions of relevant terms. Membrane based separation processes; fundamentals and various terms; classifications; Design aspects: various models and their applicabilities. External field induced membrane separation processes for colloidal particles; fundamentals of various colloid separation; derivation of profile of electric field strength; coupling with membrane separation and electrophoresis. Gas separation; Surfactant based separation processes. Liquid membranes: Fundamentals and modeling. Micellar enhanced separation processes. Cloud point extraction;Centrifugal Separation processes and their calculations. Ion exchange and chromatographic separation processes. Supercritical fluid extraction.


    Online Chemistry and lab Courses

    Online Chemistry and lab Courses

    Dr. Richard Nafshun
    Oregon State University

    At http://ecampus.oregonstate.edu/chemistry, you can earn college credit for online Chemistry and virtual labs. With no onsite visits required for 100 level classes, Oregon State University's Ecampus Chemistry classes will fit your life! Upper-level classes are also offered; these may require short on-campus lab visits, scheduled to work well for distance students. This video is from a class taught by Dr. Richard Nafshun; be sure to watch his other videos to see amazing chemistry in action.


    Online Chemistry Labs

    Online Chemistry Labs


    North Carolina School of the Arts


    Organic & Biomaterials Chemistry

    Organic & Biomaterials Chemistry

    Prof. Krystyn Van Vliet, Prof. Michael Rubner, Prof. Angela M.Belcher
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    This course covers principles of materials chemistry common to organic materials ranging from biological polypeptides to engineered block copolymers. Topics include molecular structure, polymer synthesis reactions, protein-protein interactions, multifunctional organic materials including polymeric nanoreactors, conducting polymers and virus-mediated biomineralization. WARNING NOTICE The experiments described in these materials are potentially hazardous and require a high level of safety training, special facilities and equipment, and supervision by appropriate individuals. You bear the sole responsibility, liability, and risk for the implementation of such safety procedures and measures. MIT shall have no responsibility, liability, or risk for the content or implementation of any of the material presented. Legal Notice


    Organic Chemistry 2

    Organic Chemistry 2

    Dr. Othman Hamed
    An-Najah National University


    Organic Chemistry I

    Organic Chemistry I

    Dr. Kimberly Berkowski, Prof. Sarah O´Connor
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    This subject deals primarily with the basic principles to understand the structure and reactivity of organic molecules. Emphasis is on substitution and elimination reactions and chemistry of the carbonyl group. The course also provides an introduction to the chemistry of aromatic compounds.


    Organic photochemistry and pericyclic reactions

    Organic photochemistry and pericyclic reactions

    Dr. N.D. Pradeep Singh
    Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur

    The course will involve a discussion of molecular organic photochemistry and pericyclic reactions. Initially, we will study in brief the fundamental principles of photochemistry. In the following lectures we will discuss the primary photochemical reactions of n,π*states. In the second half of our course we will be focusing on the primary photochemical reactions of π,π*states where we will discuss in detail about the pericyclic reactions. We will end our course by studying some important applications of photochemistry.


    Organic Reactions and Pharmaceuticals

    Organic Reactions and Pharmaceuticals

    Prof. Steve Hardinger
    University of California, Los Angeles

    Organic Reactions and Pharmaceuticals is a class that provides an in depth analysis of organic reactions, nucleophilic and electrophilic substitutions and additions; electrophilic aromatic substitutions, carbonyl reactions, catalysis, molecular basis of drug action, and organic chemistry of pharmaceuticals.


    Organometallic Chemistry

    Organometallic Chemistry

    Prof. Gregory Fu
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    This course examines important transformations of organotransition-metal species with an emphasis on basic mechanisms, structure-reactivity relationships, and applications in organic synthesis.


    Particle Characterization (PG)

    Particle Characterization (PG)

    Dr. R. Nagarajan
    Indian Institute of Technology, Madras

    This advanced course in “Particle Characterization” deals with methods and techniques for quantitatively and qualitatively evaluating properties of single particles and particulate assemblies. Emphasis is on the fine-particle size range, from micrometers to nanometers. Particle characteristics are linked to relevant applications in industry. Transport properties, adhesion/ cohesion phenomena and surface-particle removal mechanisms are dealt with in detail. Contents: Introduction: Need for studying particle characteristics; Typical industrial applications; emerging nano-particle technologies; microelectronics applications. Single Particle: Concept & Definition; Particle Surface; Surface-Fluid Interactions; Sub-Surface Region; Internal Grain Boundaries; Interior of Particle; Size; Shape. Particulate Assemblies: Description & Properties; Statistical Concepts; Mean Diameters & Shape Factors; Distribution Functions & Models; Surface Area & Specific Surface Calculations. Fine Particle Characterization: Size Analysis & Sampling; Shape Determination Methods; Pattern Recognition & Feature Extraction; Particle Signature & Meloy Equations; Property Representation. Physico-Chemical Properties: Visual Appearance; Absorption; Electrical Properties; Transport Properties; Adhesion & Deposition; Removal from Surfaces; Magnetism; Thermal Conductivity; Aggregation, Coagulation & Restructuring; Chemical Properties. Applications: Dust Explosions; Dust Flame Propagation; Health Hazards; Deserts & Sand Movement; Hazard Potential of Heat-Transfer Fluids; Atmospheric Aerosols; Nano-technology.


    Plantwide Control of Chemical Processes

    Plantwide Control of Chemical Processes

    Dr. Nitin Kaistha
    Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur

    The issue of control structure selection, where the control system designer must make decisions as to what variables need to be controlled and the corresponding manipulated variables, is usually treated in a very perfunctory manner in courses on control theory. In practical chemical process operation, it is this choice of the control structure that turns out to be crucial towards effective disturbance rejection and maximizing process profitability. Given the large number of control degrees-of-freedom even for the simplest of chemical processes with material/energy recycle, how does one systematically design an effective plant-wide control system? This course addresses the same using an engineering common sense approach. Essential process control theory fundamentals are very briefly covered followed by control structure design for common unit operations such as reactors, distillation columns, heat exchangers and miscellaneous operations (furnaces, refrigeration systems etc). Issues in plantwide control such as proper inventory management and effect of material/energy recycle are then highlighted followed by comprehensive plant-wide control system design case-studies on example processes. Control structure design considerations for maximizing plant profitability are explicitly covered. Based on the case-studies, a systematic plant-wide control system design procedure is developed and demonstrated on example processes. The course broadly covers process control as practiced in the process industry and prepares the ChE student for a career in process operations. Practicing engineers will also find the material useful for improving the efficiency and profitability of their processes. Contents: Essentials of process control: process dynamics, model fitting (identification), PID feedback control and tuning, advanced control structures, multivariable control, DMC. Control of common unit operations: Control of reactors, distillation control including complex column configurations, heat exchanger control, control of miscellaneous unit operations such as compressors, furnaces, refrigerators and boilers. Plant-wide control fundamentals: Snowball effect, propagation of variability, inventory management, through-put manipulation. Plant-wide control case studies: Recycle process with side reaction, Cumene process, HDA process. Systematic plant-wide control system design procedure with example applications.


    Polymer Science Laboratory

    Polymer Science Laboratory

    Mr. Harlan Breindel
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Experiments in this class are broadly aimed at acquainting students with the range of properties of polymers, methods of synthesis, and physical chemistry. Some examples of laboratory work include solution polymerization of acrylamide, bead polymerization of divinylbenzene, and interfacial polymerization of nylon 6,10. Evaluation of networks by tensile and swelling experiments, rheology of polymer solutions and suspensions, and physical properties of natural and silicone rubber are also covered.


    Preparation for General Chemistry 1P

    Preparation for General Chemistry 1P

    Eric Potma, Ph.D
    University of California, Irvine

    This is a 24 lectures undergraduate-level course titled "Preparation for General Chemistry" Prerequisite: Designed for students without high school chemistry.


    Principles of Chemical Science

    Principles of Chemical Science

    Prof. Catherine Drennan, Dr. Elizabeth Vogel Taylor
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    This course provides an introduction to the chemistry of biological, inorganic, and organic molecules. The emphasis is on basic principles of atomic and molecular electronic structure, thermodynamics, acid-base and redox equilibria, chemical kinetics, and catalysis. In an effort to illuminate connections between chemistry and biology, a list of the biology-, medicine-, and MIT research-related examples used in 5.111 is provided in Biology-Related Examples. Acknowledgements Development and implementation of the biology-related materials in this course were funded through an HHMI Professors grant to Prof. Catherine L. Drennan.


    Principles of Inorganic Chemistry III

    Principles of Inorganic Chemistry III

    Prof. Christopher Cummins
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    This course covers the principles of main group (s and p block) element chemistry with an emphasis on synthesis, structure, bonding, and reaction mechanisms.


    Process Control and Instrumentation

    Process Control and Instrumentation

    Dr. D. Sarkar Dr. A.K. Jana
    Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur

    Automatic Process Control is being used in almost all the industry verticals today.This introductory course covers basics of process control and the instrumentation used for it. The process control part begins with the introductory concepts, and mathematical modeling and its use for control purposes. Subsequently, the dynamic behavior of chemical processes will be discussed. This course goes deeper into the design of feedback controllers. A special emphasis will be placed on the controller tuning and stability analysis. Several advanced control systems will also be covered under the process control part. The instrumentation part will elaborate the valve characteristics along with the working principle, specifications, design and selection aspects of various measuring sensors. A number of practical process examples will be used to illustrate the control theory. Contents: Introduction to process control; mathematical modeling; dynamic behavior of chemical processes; feedback control structures; advanced control schemes; and instrumentation.


    Rate Processes

    Rate Processes

    Dr. M. Halder
    Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur

    Rate Laws and Effect of Temperature on Reaction Rates Theories of Reaction Rates Fast Reactions; Reactions in Solutions Ultrafast processes Reaction Dynamics


    Small-Molecule Spectroscopy and Dynamics

    Small-Molecule Spectroscopy and Dynamics

    Prof. Robert Field
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    The goal of this course is to illustrate the spectroscopy of small molecules in the gas phase: quantum mechanical effective Hamiltonian models for rotational, vibrational, and electronic structure; transition selection rules and relative intensities; diagnostic patterns and experimental methods for the assignment of non-textbook spectra; breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (spectroscopic perturbations); the stationary phase approximation; nondegenerate and quasidegenerate perturbation theory (van Vleck transformation); qualitative molecular orbital theory (Walsh diagrams); the notation of atomic and molecular spectroscopy.


    steel Making

    steel Making

    Deepak Mazumdar
    Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur


    Symmetry, Structure, and Tensor Properties of Materials

    Symmetry, Structure, and Tensor Properties of Materials

    Prof. Bernhardt Wuensch
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    This course covers the derivation of symmetry theory; lattices, point groups, space groups, and their properties; use of symmetry in tensor representation of crystal properties, including anisotropy and representation surfaces; and applications to piezoelectricity and elasticity.


    Thermodinamics & Kinetics

    Thermodinamics & Kinetics

    Prof. Keith A. Nelson, Prof. Moungi Bawendi
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    This subject deals primarily with equilibrium properties of macroscopic systems, basic thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium of reactions in gas and solution phase, and rates of chemical reactions. Acknowledgements The material for 5.60 has evolved over a period of many years, and therefore several faculty members have contributed to the development of the course contents. The following are known to have assisted in preparing the lecture notes available on OpenCourseWare: Emeritus Professors of Chemistry: Robert A. Alberty, Carl W. Garland, Irwin Oppenheim, John S. Waugh. Professors of Chemistry: Moungi Bawendi, John M. Deutch, Robert W. Field, Robert G. Griffin, Keith A. Nelson, Robert J. Silbey, Jeffrey I. Steinfeld. Professor of Bioengineering and Computer Science: Bruce Tidor. Professor of Chemistry, Rice University: James L. Kinsey. Professor of Physics, University of Illinois: Philip W. Phillips.

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