International Year of Chemistry, 2011

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International Year of Chemistry 2011

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Chemical Landmarks

Idea by Tim Reynolds   |   added on Feb 03, 2010 02:18PM Suggestion Suggestion
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International or National Chemical Landmarks have been used to mark significant anniversaries, people and places in the history and development of the chemical sciences. During 2011 it would be appropriate to initiate a similar programme in Belgium (and elsewhere of course!).

International or National Chemical Landmarks have been used by the American Chemical Society (ACS) in North America and the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) in the UK to mark significant anniversaries, people and places in the history and development of the chemical sciences.

 

During 2011 it would be appropriate to initiate a similar programme in Belgium. Following consultation with RSC members in Belgium two candidates for initial Landmarks are suggested: Solvay and Kekule.

 

1/ Ernst Solvay is a very significant figure in the establishment of the Belgian chemical industry and the organisation of chemical science in Belgium. IYC2011 coincides with the first 100th anniversary of the Solvay Conference that took place at the Metropole Hotel in Autumn 1911 where the closing event for IYC2011 is planned in Brussels.

 

Possible sites for the Landmark could be the Metropole Hotel itself, or the Solvay Library (where subsequent Solvay Conferences were held) which is very close to the European Parliament in Brussels, or at a Solvay office or facility as appropriate.

 

Such a Landmark would also be an opportunity to work with the European Physical Society (the Solvay conferences are/ were focused on both chemistry and physics) as well as the home Belgian Chemical community, EuCheMS, Cefic, SusChem et al. Perhaps it could even see the revival of the AllChemE brand?

 

2/ Kekule is, of course, German by origin, but he had his “benzene snakes” dream while working at Ghent University and did most of his significant research there. His “dream” marks a fundamental point in the evolution of organic chemistry and is a very significant step in the development of the chemical industry.

 

This landmark could be a collaborative venture with the various Belgian chemical societies, Ghent University and GDCh.


Topic: historic, landmarks Audience: general public, decision makers

Comments

Albert Ahatov
Apr 15, 2010 06:58PM

i could be the organiser in our city

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