International Year of Chemistry, 2011

UNESCO - United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization IUPAC - International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry

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International Year of Chemistry 2011

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Beautiful Experiments in Chemistry

Activity by Jacqui Colgate   |   added on Feb 01, 2011   |   United Kingdom Official_iyc_logo

Sponsor(s): Organised by SCI's Cambridge & Great Eastern Group, and RSC's Mid-Anglia Section

Scientists frequently talk about ‘beauty' in their work, but rarely stop to think quite what they mean by it. What makes an experiment beautiful? Is it the clarity of the design? The elegance of the apparatus? The nature of the knowledge gained?

Beautiful Experiments in Chemistry and SCI CaGE AGM

 

 

 

Pfizer Lecture Theatre, Department of Chemistry, Cambridge
12 May 2011, 19:00 - 20:00
Organised by SCI's Cambridge & Great Eastern Group, and RSC's Mid-Anglia Section

This event will be preceded at 18:30 by the SCI Cambridge & Great Eastern Region AGM. Synopsis

Scientists frequently talk about ‘beauty' in their work, but rarely stop to think quite what they mean by it. What makes an experiment beautiful? Is it the clarity of the design? The elegance of the apparatus? The nature of the knowledge gained? There have been several recent attempts to identify ‘beautiful' experiments in science, especially in physics. But Philip Ball argues that, not only is chemistry often neglected in these surveys, but it has its own special kinds of beauty, linked to the fact that it is a branch of science strongly tied to the art of making things: new molecules and materials, new smells and colours. He offers suggestions for ten particularly beautiful experiments in chemistry, taken from his recent book Elegant Solutions: Ten Beautiful Experiments in Chemistry. (There will be an opportunity to purchase signed copies after the event.)

Location

Pfizer Lecture Theatre, Department of Chemistry, Lensfield Road, Cambridge, UK
Please click here for a location map.
 

Speaker
 

Philip Ball, prizewinning science writer. He was an editor for Nature for over 10 years and now contributes a regular column in the RSC’s Chemistry World. His book Critical Mass: How One Things Leads to Another won the 2005 Aventis Prize. Other works include Bright Earth: The Invention of Colour and most recently The Music Instinct.

Delegate Fees
 

Free admission. Open to the public. Suitable for GCSE students. No tickets, so arrive early to get a good seat.

For more information and to book, please contact:

John O'Toole
T:
01223 894174
E:
john.otoole9@btopenworld.com


Topic: celebrating chemistry, chemistry education, educational materials, conferences, networking Audience: students, professional chemists, educators, professors, general public, industrial chemists, post graduate students, teachers, women chemists, educational institutions
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