International Year of Chemistry, 2011

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Hydrogen Storage Materials: Faraday Discussion 151

Activity by Ann Ennis   |   added on Dec 01, 2010   |   United Kingdom Official_iyc_logo

Sponsor(s): Royal Society of Chemistry, Institute of Physics Materials and Characterisation Group

Hydrogen is widely billed as the fuel of the future. In addition to compressed (either liquid or gaseous) hydrogen, two main themes are being explored: adsorption of hydrogen by materials and "chemical hydrogen" where hydrogen is reacted with a material.

Faraday Discussion 151: Hydrogen Storage Materials
18 - 20 April 2011
Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon, UK

Hydrogen is widely billed as the fuel of the future. For this to be a reality there is a pressing need for a safe, economic and reliable way to transport hydrogen, particularly for automotive applications. This has prompted a world-wide effort to develop novel materials that are re-usable and capable of storing and releasing significant (> 6 wt%) quantities of hydrogen.

The discussion will focus on both themes, from synthesis and characterisation to application of such novel materials. The focus will be on the wider issues involved in synthetic routes, characterisation, materials properties, rather than simply on examples. The importance of the interplay of theory and experiment will be stressed.

The aim is to bring together the diverse range of workers in the field of hydrogen storage materials, from those involved in materials discovery and characterisation, to those studying mechanisms or developing applications. It will both inform people of alternative strategies and encourage new ideas and approaches.

www.rsc.org/fd151


Topic: conferences, chemistry, networking, future fuels, green chemistry Audience: professional chemists, physicists, industrial chemists, postgraduate students, undergraduates, universities, research scientists, professors
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