International Year of Chemistry, 2011

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International Year of Chemistry 2011

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Honoring Marie Curie

Activity by Sheehan Misko   |   added on Mar 10, 2011   |   United States Official_iyc_logo

Sponsor(s): Clinical Chemistry

Susan Quinn, an award-winning writer of nonfiction books and articles highlights the 100th anniversary of Marie Curie (née Sklodowska, 1867–1934) receiving the Nobel Prize in chemistry for discovering radium and polonium, the latter named after her native Poland.

Clinical Chemistry, April 2011 (www.clinchem.org)

HONORING MARIE CURIE

The year 2011 marks the 100th anniversary of Marie Curie (née Sklodowska, 1867–1934) receiving the Nobel Prize in chemistry for discovering radium and polonium, the latter named after her native Poland. This award was her second Nobel Prize; her first, in physics, was shared with her husband Pierre and Henri Becquerel for their work on radioactivity, a term she coined. She is the first woman to teach at the Sorbonne, and her achievements earned her the honor, on April 20, 1995, of being the first woman to have her ashes enshrined, "for her own merits" as President François Mitterrand stressed, in the Pantheon in Paris, the memorial dedicated to the "great men" of France. In collaboration with the Chemical Heritage Foundation and the École Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles, the research center in Paris in which Madame Curie conducted her work, Clinical Chemistry is pleased to honor this remarkable woman and celebrate her accomplishments. Susan Quinn, an award-winning writer of nonfiction books and articles and the author of Marie Curie: A Life, will highlight Curie's scientific achievements and contributions and reflect on her amazing determination and perseverance at a time when it was so difficult for women to be successful in science. Susan Quinn's biography of Madame Curie, which has been translated into 8 languages, was awarded the Grand Prix des Lectrices de Elle in 1997. The biography received wide critical praise from both the scientific and lay press, such as: "fresh and powerful ...certain to be this generation's definitive biography" (Science); "It is remarkable that Marie Curie has had to wait so long for a biographer of such excellence" (London Sunday Times); and "Quinn replaces this icon with a fully dimensional person, a woman who can now serve to inspire future chemists and physicists even more" (Washington Post Book World).


Topic: celebrating chemistry, chemistry education, publications, art, references Audience: students, professional chemists, professors, educators, general public, industrial chemists, universities, post graduate students, teachers, research scientists, women chemists, decision makers, educational institutions, tertiary education, secondary school students, secondary schools, school children, high schools, secondary schools students
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