Chemistry 2011.org
Chemistry2011.org
All About Chemistry... 2011 and beyond
Nanorods

Related Stories

New technique controls dimensions of gold nanorods while manufacturing on a large scale

Nov. 19, 2013 — North Carolina State University researchers have developed a technique for efficiently producing nanoscale gold rods in large quantities while simultaneously controlling the dimensions of the nanorods and their optical properties. The optical properties of gold nanorods make them desirable for use in biomedical applications ranging from imaging technologies to cancer treatment.

"This technique should facilitate the economical manufacture of large volumes of gold nanorods," says Dr. Joseph Tracy, an associate professor of materials science and engineering at NC State and senior author of a paper on the work. "And that should be good news for both the science community and the biomedical research and development community."

The NC State team started with an existing technique, in which gold nanorods are formed by mixing two chemical solutions together. However, that technique only converts 30 percent of the gold into nanorods -- the rest remains dissolved in solution.

To convert the remaining 70 percent of the gold into nanorods, the researchers added a continuous stream of ascorbic acid (better known as vitamin C) to the solution, while constantly stirring the mixture. The ascorbic acid essentially pulls the gold out of the solution and deposits it on the existing nanorods.

But the researchers also found that the slower they added the ascorbic acid, the stubbier the nanorods became. This is important because the optical properties of gold nanorods depend on their "aspect ratio" -- their relative height and width. For example, long, thin gold nanorods absorb light at wavelengths greater than 800 nanometers (in the near infrared spectrum), while shorter, wider gold nanorods absorb light at wavelengths below 700 nanometers (red or dark red).

"The ability to fine-tune these optical properties will likely be useful for the development of new biomedical applications," Tracy says.

Share this story with your friends!

Social Networking

Please recommend us on Facebook, Twitter and more:

Other social media tools

Global Partners
Feedback

Tell us what you think of Chemistry 2011 -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?

About us

Chemistry2011 is an informational resource for students, educators and the self-taught in the field of chemistry. We offer resources such as course materials, chemistry department listings, activities, events, projects and more along with current news releases.

Events & Activities

Are you interested in listing an event or sharing an activity or idea? Perhaps you are coordinating an event and are in need of additional resources? Within our site you will find a variety of activities and projects your peers have previously submitted or which have been freely shared through creative commons licenses. Here are some highlights: Featured Idea 1, Featured Idea 2.

About you

Ready to get involved? The first step is to sign up by following the link: Join Here. Also don’t forget to fill out your profile including any professional designations.

Global Partners