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The Low Down on Sweet N Low, Apple and Lettuce Can Remedy Garlic Breath, Using X-Rays to Figure Out Fats, and More in the Food Science News Source

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PHILADELPHIA—Toxins from mold found growing on nuts or corn can weaken the airways’ self-clearing mechanisms and immunity, opening the door for respiratory diseases and exacerbating existing ones, suggests a study in Nature Scientific Reports published this month from otolaryngology researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

–Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania |2016-09-27

Click here to go to the Food Science News Source

– Newswise|2016-09-27

Click here to go directly to the DOE Science News Source

– Newswise|2016-09-26

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University of Sydney researchers have confirmed widespread bias in industry-funded research into artificial sweeteners, which is potentially misleading millions by overstating their health benefits.

–University of Sydney|2016-09-26

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Mice placed on a low-calorie diet are less likely to develop abdominal aortic aneurysms, according to a new study in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. The paper, “Calorie restriction protects against experimental abdominal aortic aneurysms in mice,” which will be published online September 26 ahead of issue, suggests new ways to prevent the often fatal condition from occurring in humans.

–The Rockefeller University Press|2016-09-26

Paul Magnotto, Founder & CEO of DFI, and Krisda Monthienvichienchai, Mitr Phol Group Chief Executive Officer jointly announced today that both companies had reached a strategic investment and partnership agreement to expand production of natural sweeteners that offer distinct health benefits and superior taste compared to existing low calorie sweeteners.

–DFI|2016-09-26

The Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) today announced the appointment Brenda Knapp-Polzin, MS, CFS (Cargill) as chair and Norma Dawkins, PhD, CFS (Tuskegee University) as vice-chair of the International Food Science Certification Commission (IFSCC). IFSCC oversees the governance and policy making of the Certified Food Scientist (CFS) program. Additionally, Sanjay Gummalla, PhD, CFS (American Frozen Food Institute), Deirdre Schlunegger (STOP Foodborne Illness), and Moira McGrath (OPUS International) were appointed as commissioners to serve three-year terms on IFSCC.

–Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)|2016-09-22

Garlic – consumers either love or hate the taste, but one thing is for certain, no one likes it when the scent of it sticks around on their breath. Now, garlic lovers may have a new solution to their halitosis problem. A study published in the September issue of the Journal of Food Science found that eating raw apple or lettuce may help reduce garlic breath.

–Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)|2016-09-22

Low concentration of fish oil in the blood and lack of physical activity may contribute to the high levels of depressed mood among soldiers returning from combat, according to researchers, including a Texas A&M University professor and his former doctoral student.

–Texas A&M University|2016-09-22

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University of Guelph researchers studying the intimate structure of edible fats are getting help from the United States Department of Energy.

–University of Guelph|2016-09-22

Cystinosis is a rare disease that usually strikes children before they are two years old and can lead to end stage kidney failure before their tenth birthday. Current treatments are limited, which is why the CIRM Board today approved $5.2 million for research that holds the possibility of a safe, effective, one-time life-long treatment.

–California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM)|2016-09-21

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Coffee is one of the most popular drinks in the U.S., which makes for a perky population — but it also creates a lot of used grounds. Scientists now report in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering an innovative way to reduce this waste and help address another environmental problem. They have incorporated spent coffee grounds in a foam filter that can remove harmful lead and mercury from water.

–American Chemical Society (ACS)|2016-09-21

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New research from the University of Missouri has identified a problem associated with the requirement that when children turn five, they are no longer eligible to receive food assistance from WIC, thus leading to increased food insecurity for the family. The researchers say policy makers should consider extending WIC eligibility until children enter school, rather than setting an age limit.

–University of Missouri Health|2016-09-20

Children and teenagers who are obese have different microorganisms living in the digestive tract than their lean counterparts, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

–Endocrine Society|2016-09-20

Feeding babies egg and peanut may reduce their risk of developing an allergy to the foods, finds a new study.

–Imperial College London|2016-09-20

Reston, VA (September 20, 2016) Results from a new study reveal that binge-eating disorder (BED) is associated with increased risk of multiple medical comorbidities.

–Academy for Eating Disorders (AED)|2016-09-20

A team of researchers led by the University of Birmingham warns that without significant improvements in technology, global crop yields are likely to fall in the areas currently used for production of the world’s three major cereal crops, forcing production to move to new areas.

–University of Birmingham|2016-09-20

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Mississippi State University President Mark E. Keenum highlighted the important role universities and open data play in addressing world hunger during a speech at the U.N. in New York Friday [Sept. 16].

–Mississippi State University|2016-09-19

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An Iowa State University scientist is exploring the adaptations that have allowed corn to be cultivated in a wide range of elevations and environments across the Americas. Comparing corn varieties adapted to low elevations with those adapted to high elevations reveals some striking differences and could help plant breeders develop varieties more resistant to environmental stresses.

–Iowa State University|2016-09-19

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As researchers nationwide try to get college students to eat healthier foods, they’re finding that gardening may lead to a lasting habit of eating more fruits and vegetables.

–University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences|2016-09-19

Cognitive function improves with aerobic exercise, but not for people exposed to high levels of mercury before birth, according to research funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health. Adults with high prenatal exposure to methylmercury, which mainly comes from maternal consumption of fish with high mercury levels, did not experience the faster cognitive processing and better short term memory benefits of exercise that were seen in those with low prenatal methylmercury exposures.

–National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)|2016-09-16

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Scientists and consumers recognize the cholesterol-lowering power of oats, but what few know is that most of the oats American milling companies use comes from Canada. To increase oats production in the Midwest, researchers are developing methods to speed up selection of breeding material to improve the nutritional and milling qualities of new oat varieties—that includes developing ways to increase beta-glucan.

–South Dakota State University|2016-09-15

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Sturdy, lightweight carbon foam has many structural and insulating applications in aerospace engineering, Energy-Storage'>energy storage and temperature maintenance. Current methods to create this material run into difficulties when trying to make the product strong, lightweight, environmentally friendly and low-cost. Now, a group reports in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces a method to produce such a carbon foam by using super-toasted bread.

–American Chemical Society (ACS)|2016-09-15

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Saving up excess solar and wind energy for times when the sun is down or the air is still requires a storage device. Batteries get the most attention as a promising solution although pumped hydroelectric storage is currently used most often. Now researchers reporting in ACS’ Journal of Physical Chemistry C are advancing another potential approach using sugar alcohols — an abundant waste product of the food industry — mixed with carbon nanotubes.

–American Chemical Society (ACS)|2016-09-15

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n recent years, consumers have increasingly been looking for “natural” ingredients in their food products. But when it comes to one of the world’s most popular flavors, vanilla, meeting that demand has been difficult. So food scientists are scrambling for new ways to produce vanillin — the main vanilla flavor molecule — without losing the natural label, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

–American Chemical Society (ACS)|2016-09-15

JNEB is soliciting manuscripts for a supplemental issue on breastfeeding and the WIC Program

–Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior |2016-09-15

Our brain pays more attention to food when we are hungry than when we are sated. Now a team of scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) has shed light on how the needs of the body affect the way the brain processes visual food cues. In two newly-published studies, the researchers examined – with unprecedented resolution – the brain circuits responsible for the differences in the way the brain responds to visual food cues during hunger versus satiety.

–Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center|2016-09-14

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An article in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology explains that food proximity challenges prove to most kids they can be near food allergy triggers without fear.

–American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI)|2016-09-14

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