Chemistry 2011.org
Chemistry2011.org
All About Chemistry... 2011 and beyond

Related Stories

Understanding Mussels' Stickiness Could Lead to Better Surgical and Underwater Glues

Released: 6/4/2014 8:00 AM EDT
Source Newsroom: American Chemical Society (ACS)
Contact Information

Available for logged-in reporters only

Citations Langmuir

Jun. 7, 2014 - Mussels might be a welcome addition to a hearty seafood stew, but their notorious ability to attach themselves to ships’ hulls, as well as to piers and moorings, makes them an unwelcome sight and smell for boaters and swimmers. Now, researchers report in ACS’ journal Langmuir a clearer understanding of how mussels stick to surfaces, which could lead to new classes of adhesives that will work underwater and even inside the body.

Shabeer Ahmad Mian and colleagues note that mussels have a remarkable knack for clinging onto solid surfaces underwater. That can make them a real nuisance to recreational boaters and professional fishermen, who have to scrape the hitchhikers off their vessels to help them run more efficiently. Some types of mussels can even plug up drinking water pipes. Mussels also can stick to materials with nonstick coatings. Although researchers have already developed mussel-inspired glues, they still don’t have a full understanding of exactly how these critters stick so well to underwater surfaces. So, Mian’s team set out to investigate this mystery in painstaking detail to improve these adhesives and to develop new ones.

Using complex calculations and simulations, they determined that one part of the mussel “glue” molecule, called catechol, pushes water molecules out of the way to bind directly to wide variety of surfaces. They say that this study provides a clear picture of the first step of mussel adhesion, which could pave the way for better adhesives for many applications, such as for use in surgeries. The adhesives can be nontoxic and biocompatible, says Mian.

The researchers acknowledge funding from the Korean Government (Ministry of Education), the Korea Institute of Science and Technology and the University of Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

ARTICLE #2 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
“A Fundamental Understanding of Catechol and Water Adsorption on a Hydrophilic Silica Surface: Exploring the Underwater Adhesion Mechanism of Mussels on an Atomic Scale”
DOWNLOAD FULL-TEXT ARTICLE


Comment/Share


Share this story with your friends!

Social Networking

Please recommend us on Facebook, Twitter and more:

Other social media tools

Global Partners
Feedback

Tell us what you think of Chemistry 2011 -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?

About us

Chemistry2011 is an informational resource for students, educators and the self-taught in the field of chemistry. We offer resources such as course materials, chemistry department listings, activities, events, projects and more along with current news releases.

Events & Activities

Are you interested in listing an event or sharing an activity or idea? Perhaps you are coordinating an event and are in need of additional resources? Within our site you will find a variety of activities and projects your peers have previously submitted or which have been freely shared through creative commons licenses. Here are some highlights: Featured Idea 1, Featured Idea 2.

About you

Ready to get involved? The first step is to sign up by following the link: Join Here. Also don’t forget to fill out your profile including any professional designations.

Global Partners